Porto to Braga train

One of the best parts about traveling in Portugal is that you can hop from city-to-city with ease. Today, we are going to break down how to go from Porto to Braga by train, and some of the best activities you can enjoy when in Braga.

If you are staying in Porto, there are two stations that can take you to Braga: Porto Sao Bento and Porto Campanha. Regardless of which station you choose to depart from, I recommend taking the time to visit Porto Sao Bento which is known as one of the most beautiful train stations in all of Europe. The walls of Porto Sao Bento are covered in azulejos (tiles) with spectacular artistic renditions of historical scenes. Please go if you have the time!

What do I need for the Porto to Braga Train?

All you will need is a ticket and your passport. To buy your ticket you can visit www.cp.pt. When buying your ticket, you will likely be asked for your passport number. Your passport is your form of identification, so make sure to take it with you on your train ride. 

The only other thing you need for this train is a face mask. All transportation, public and private, requires the use of face masks. Check their website for further details on Covid-19 regulations.

How long is the ride to Braga? Is it expensive?

Leaving from Sao Bento

The train from Sao Bento takes 59 minutes on average, with trains leaving every 30 minutes. Trains start at 6:15 AM and end at 12:05 AM, but be mindful that the schedule is subject to change based on holidays and weekends. 

The price of one ticket to Braga can from €3.25 to €15 ($3.76 to $17.37) depending on which route you take. 

Leaving from Porto Campanha

Porto Campanha to Braga can take anywhere from 40 minutes to an hour, depending on the train. The trains start at 6:20 AM and end at 12:55 AM. Similar to the Sao Bento trains, these timings can change if there is a holiday, or it is the weekend, so make sure to plan accordingly. 

The price of a one-way ticket costs between €3.25 to €12.50 ($3.76 to $14.48) depending on the route. 

Some routes may have transfers, so double check the route to see if it direct or with transfers. The image below shows what a direct route and one with transfers looks like. 

The top line is a direct route, while the bottom one includes a transfer between two different trains – the IR train and the U train. For the U train it’s best to print out your tickets – some conductors don’t accept digital.

What are some fun activities I can do in Braga?

There are so many fun activities in Braga it’s hard to choose just a few. After lots of hard thinking, here are my top three!

Visit Bom Jesus do Monte

To reach the famous viewpoint you need to climb up 640 steps that zig zag in different directions. As you go up the stairs, you are surrounded with beautiful sculptures, fountains and art. Once you reach the top of the stairs, you will find a gorgeous neoclassical-style church with one of the best views of Braga. 

Ride the funiculars around town

Similar to the tram system in San Francisco, many cities in Portugal have their own system called “funiculars.” These funiculars transport local citizens daily, helping them to avoid the steep hills of the city. Riding one of these is the perfect way to explore the city and experience an essential part of Portuguese daily life.

Garden of Santa Barbara

This luscious garden is the perfect escape from the hustle and bustle of the city. Adjacent to the Archbishop’s Palace, this garden is styled in the same Romantic stylings of the palace. Each section of the garden is perfectly geometric, yet houses wildflowers within its clean shapes. 

Other great places in Braga

If you have more time in Braga, some other activities are:

  • Raio Palace 
  • Braga Cathedral
  • Museum of Sacred Art
  • Capela São Frutuoso de Montélios

I hope this post has made your travel planning easier, and that you thoroughly enjoy your time in Portugal! 

Boa Viagem (Have a good trip)! 

If you enjoyed this article you might also like to read about North Portugal Itinerary: 10 Days From Aveiro to Porto

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